Chapter 18: Uranus, Neptune & Pluto prove the PVP orbit

Uranus, Neptune and Pluto can all be shown to drift eastwards against the stars due to Earth’s 1.6km/h motion around its PVP orbit. All three of them are currently believed to have orbital periods curiously just a whisker short of an integer number of solar years (much like we just saw with Jupiter and Saturn). In reality, their orbital periods are exact multiples of our Moon's TMSP (True Mean Synodic Period) of 29.22 days.

Here follow the 'official' orbital periods of Uranus, Neptune and Pluto:

Uranus

“Orbital period: 30589 days” — about 83.74 years, or a trifle less than 84 years

Neptune

“Orbital Period: 60182 days.” — about 164.77 years, or a trifle less than 165 years

Pluto

“Orbital Period: 90560 days.” — about 247.94 years, or a trifle less than 248 years

Source: Planetary Fact Sheet_ by David R. Williams, NASA

As we shall see, the orbital periods of Uranus, Neptune and Pluto are - in actuality - all perfectly synchronized (at integer multiples) with the Moon's TMSP of 29.22 days. In the TYCHOS, their true orbital periods are, respectively, 84, 165 & 248 solar years - after which they all return to the exact same place.

It is essential to understand what is meant by “the exact same place”. Yes, this means that these planets return to the same celestial location within the said time intervals. As viewed from Earth, however, they will appear to have advanced by a small amount in relation to the starry background.

The reason why they will appear (to earthly observers) to be slightly “offset” against the firmament after completing one of their orbits is due to the parallax effect caused by Earth's 'clockwise' motion around its PVP orbit. This will presently be demonstrated by my next three graphics which feature screenshots (at integer intervals of 84, 165 and 248 years) taken from the NEAVE online planetarium.

Uranus — in the TYCHOS:

Orbital period of Uranus: exactly 84 Solar Years, or 30681 days – or exactly 1050 X 29.22 days (our Moon's TMSP).

In 84 years, Earth moves by 14036 km X 84 ≈ 1 179 024 km (i.e. 0.3314% of the PVP orbit's circumference of 355 724 597 km). Now, 0.3314% of our full, 360° celestial sphere of 1440 min = 4.77216 min of RA.

In fact, the NEAVE planetarium shows us a close match:

Between Oct 15, 2016 and Oct 15, 2100 (84 years), Uranus returns to the same celestial longitude (RA) + circa 4.4 min of RA.

We may thus reasonably interpret this apparent displacement of Uranus as being a consequence of Earth's slow motion around its PVP orbit.

Neptune — in the TYCHOS:

Orbital period: exactly 165 Solar Years, or 60266.25 days – or exactly 2062.5 x 29.22 days (our Moon's TMSP).

In 165 years, Earth moves by 14036 km X 165 ≈ 2 315 915 km (0.651% of the PVP orbit's circumference of 355 724 597 km). Now, 0.651% of our full, 360° celestial sphere of 1440 min ≈ 9.375 min of RA - and in fact, the NEAVE planetarium shows us a close match.

Between Sept 5, 2017 and Sept 5, 2182 (165 years) Neptune returns to the same celestial longitude (RA) + circa 10 min of RA!

Note that the Earth-Neptune parallax (9.375 min) is ca. 1.965 X larger than the Earth-Uranus parallax (4.77216 min.). This reflects the fact that Neptune’s revolution period of 165 years is ca. 1.965 X longer than Uranus’s revolution period of 84 years.

Pluto — in the TYCHOS:

Orbital period: exactly 248 Solar Years, or 90582 days – or exactly 3100 X 29.22 days (our Moon's TMSP).

In 248 years, Earth moves by 14036 km X 248 ≈ 3 480 890 km (0.978535% of the PVP orbit's circumference of 355 724 597 km). Now, 0.978535% of our full, 360° celestial sphere of 1440 min ≈ 14 min. of RA - again, the NEAVE planetarium gives us another (fairly close) match:

Between Oct 28, 1941 and Oct 28, 2189 (248 years), Pluto returns to the same celestial longitude (RA) + circa 12 min of RA.

Note that the (expected) Earth-Pluto parallax (14 min) is ca. 1.5 X larger than the Earth-Neptune parallax (9.3744 min.). This reflects the fact that Pluto’s revolution period of 248 years is ca. 1.5 X longer than Neptune’s revolution period of 165 years.

In conclusion, the true values of the orbital periods of these planets are - in actuality - integer multiples of the TMSP (our Moon's True Mean Synodic Period). All of their apparent precessional drifts relatively to the stars are parallax effects directly caused by Earth’s 1.6km/h motion around its PVP orbit.